Research Updates

Public/Private Effort Yields Key Progress

An innovative new public/private collaboration between Cure Alzheimer’s Fund and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) already has started to bear fruit.

Alzheimer's Proteins Found In Cerebrospinal Fluid of Older Patients Post Surgery

BOSTON – New research examining levels of the hallmark proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease found in patients suffering from post-operative cognitive changes (POCC) may lead to safer surgery care and better post-operative outcomes for senior adults.

Newly Identified Gene Variations Provide Clues About Origins of Alzheimer’s

Research uncovering 12 new gene variations connected to the cause of the early-onset familial form of Alzheimer’s disease (EO-FAD), which generally strikes before the age of 65, is being published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

Targretin Fails: High Hopes Dashed for a New Treatment for Alzheimer’s

While many were anxious to accept initial findings showing a drug known as Targretin’s “too good to be true” lab results with Alzheimer’s disease, subsequent attempts to confirm and replicate the original data regarding the ability of Targretin to remove amyloid plaques, the cardinal lesion of the disease, have largely failed. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund Research Consortium members Dr. Sangram Sisodia, professor of neuroscience at the University of Chicago and Dr.

New Alzheimer’s Gene, CD33, May Hold Key to Treatment

BOSTON— Excessive levels of the protein CD33 can impede the clearance of the plaque-forming protein, amyloid beta, the key component of senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients. The discovery, made by Dr. Rudolph Tanzi and colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital, and co-funded by the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) will be published in the journal Neuron.

Exposure to Air Pollution May Increase Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease


The study, led by Cure Alzheimer’s Research Consortium member Sam Gandy, M.D., Ph.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, examined how elements in air pollution such as nickel nanoparticles affect the levels of certain peptides in the brain that are found to be at heightened levels in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease.

“We don’t yet completely understand why the peptides accumulate, but we do know the genes responding to the peptides play an important role in developing Alzheimer’s,” said Gandy.

Traumatic Brain Injury Linked to Alzheimer's and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) can lead to neurodegenerative syndromes that include Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).

The April issue of Nature Reviews Neurology is devoted to Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). Cure Alzheimer’s Fund research consortium member, Sam Gandy, M.D., Ph.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is senior author of the lead review and overview.

Reprogramming Cells to Understand Alzheimer's Disease

Collaboration with the New York Stem Cell Foundation will involve using skin samples and brain imaging to identify causes and cures

Stem Cells Accelerate Research & Drug Discovery

Washington—Uncovering the cure for Alzheimer’s disease at a rate never before possible and giving individuals a way to better understand their chances of facing Alzheimer’s are the outcomes of new advances in stem cell research from the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund (CAF) Stem Cell Research Consortium that use skin samples to identify potential therapies for the disease.

Origins of Alzheimer's Increasingly Clear

Consensus among Alzheimer’s researchers about the origins of the disease is growing. Most, including members of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund Research Consortium, agree that a combination of factors, beginning with the excessive build-up of the peptide Abeta42  triggering  the development of tau tangles, nerve cell death, and inflammation are all required for Alzheimer’s pathology.