Alzheimer's therapy

Ending Alzheimer’s in Our Lifetime: From Genes to Therapies

Ending Alzheimer’s in Our Lifetime: From Genes to Therapies

Rudy Tanzi, Ph.D., professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, presents “Ending Alzheimer’s in Our Lifetime: From Genes to Therapies” on July 10, 2014 at the Martha’s Vineyard Hebrew Center’s Summer Institute.

Inside the Alzheimer's Lab: Interviews With Our Researchers

Over the past few years, our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease has increased immensely. We can now identify three distinct parts of the disease pathology: early-stage Abeta (amyloid) accumulation, mid-stage development of tau tangles, and late-stage inflammation.

Scientists on our Research Consortium are investigating all three of these points of intervention. On March 6, we talked to Drs. Steven Wagner, David Holtzman, and Rudy Tanzi about how their labs are working to stop Alzheimer’s in its early, middle, and late stages.

 

Circadian Clock Proteins a Potential Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer’s

Brain aging is associated with lower production of circadian clock proteins, which synchronize biological processes to light and dark cycles. In Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, circadian dysfunction is commonly observed.

Desperate For a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments

"Desperate For A Cure: The Search For New Alzheimer's Treatments", a new five-part series by NPR's Sean Corcoran, aired this week on WCAI and will air again next week on WGBH in Boston.

Drs. Sam Gandy and Scott Noggle Receive NIH Grant

Drs. Sam Gandy and Scott Noggle have received an NIH grant to gain new insights and identify potential therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

Solanezumab Fails in Trial -- But May Still Help with Mild Alzheimer's

On Friday, August 24, Eli Lilly announced that their beta-amyloid immunotherapy (solanezumab) failed to meet its primary clinical endpoints for Alzheimer's disease. This disappointment follows the recent failure of another promising beta-amyloid immunotherapy, bapineuzumab from Pfizer/Johnson and Johnson-Jannsen/Elan. Both drugs failed in Phase 3 clinical trials, where they were being tested for their actual effect on Alzheimer's patients.