Research Updates

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund and Rotary Co-Fund Research on Women and Alzheimer’s

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund and Rotary joined forces this fall to fund research into why women are more likely to get Alzheimer’s disease than men.

Rotary and Cure Alzheimer's Fund Co-Sponsor Research Focusing on Why Women Get Alzheimer's More Than Men

(CHICAGO, IL) – OCTOBER 7, 2016 – Rotary and Cure Alzheimer’s Fund today announced an agreement to co-fund a new, groundbreaking research project to search for female-specific genetic and other factors contributing to women’s risk for Alzheimer’s disease. In total, the two organizations will provide a grant of $375,000 for this critical research.

Protecting Synapses in Adults: An Early Intervention for Alzheimer’s?

What do the developing brain and the Alzheimer’s brain have in common? Beth Stevens, Ph.D., a developmental neurologist, is investigating an important connection: the loss of synapses, where neurons connect with one another to transmit important signals.

Air Pollution and Alzheimer's: Sound the Alarm

New evidence—funded by Cure Alzheimer’s Fund (CAF) and others—has emerged suggesting a strong connection between air pollution and Alzheimer’s disease. “These findings underscore the complexity of this disease,” says CAF President and CEO Tim Armour, “and emphasize the need for a comprehensive approach to stop it.” 

New Insights Into the Blood-Brain Barrier

Three recent discoveries have clarified one of the least-understood elements of Alzheimer’s disease: how the blood-brain barrier becomes compromised and contributes to the disease process.

Driving Genes to Therapies

Building on its enormously successful “Whole Genome Sequencing” Project, which identified nearly 1,000 new genetic mutations in more than 50 different genes, Cure Alzheimer's Fund has announced a new, even more ambitious multiyear, $50 million plus program titled “Genes to Therapies” (G2T). Simply put, the new project’s goal is to use the most promising recent genetic discoveries to develop drugs that would stop the disease at three separate stages:

Sleep Regulation Protein a Promising Target for Preventing Alzheimer's

New research by David Holtzman, M.D. at the Washington University School of Medicine points to a sleep regulation protein in the brain as a possible target for Alzheimer's disease treatment or prevention. The protein, called orexin, plays a role in rousing the brain from sleep. 

A Trio of Breakthroughs

Recent months have witnessed three remarkable developments in projects supported by Cure Alzheimer’s Fund.

“Game Changer”: New York Times trumpets “giant step forward” by Tanzi lab

For the first time, and to the astonishment of many of their colleagues, researchers created what they call Alzheimer’s in a Dish — a petri dish with human brain cells that develop the telltale structures of Alzheimer’s disease.