News

UPI: $150,000 Alzheimer's study grant awarded

Cure Alzheimer's Fund awarded the University of Texas Health Science Center and the University of Houston a $150,000 grant to fund important Alzheimer's research.

The grant will give researchers the opportunity to accelerate their use of nanotechnology and new imaging techniques to study the effects of certain compounds of the Amyloid-Beta protein.

Click on the link to read the article in full: http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2010/06/03/150000-Alzheimers-study-grant-awarded/UPI-57721275586850/

CAF awards grant to UTHealth & UH for innovative research on imaging-based diagnostic and treatment

Boston - (June 2, 2010) – Cure Alzheimer’s Fund recently awarded the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and the University of Houston a $150,000 grant to fund innovative research on Alzheimer’s disease, which currently affects 5.3 million Americans and their families and is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly.

Tim Armour, president and CEO of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund (CAF) applauded the project and noted its novel approach to the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. “The pioneering research being done at UTHealth and UH on Alzheimer’s disease is helping to better understand this devastating disease and could lead to better ways to reverse its effects and even find a cure,” he said.

The grant will allow UTHealth and UH researchers to accelerate their use of nanotechnology and new imaging techniques to study the effects of certain compounds of Amyloid-Beta, a protein that is commonly linked to the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, on the brain. Most importantly the scientists will focus on the creation of new intravenous delivery mechanisms for compounds such as gamma secretase modulators, which are believed to have the potential to protect against the development of the debilitating disease.

“We’re developing nanocarriers designed to deliver therapeutic and imaging agents directly to the amyloid lesions,” said Ananth Annapragada, Ph.D., a lead researcher on the pre-clinical project and the Robert H. Graham Professor of Entrepreneurial Biomedical Informatics and Bioengineering at The University of Texas School of Health Information Sciences at Houston (SHIS), a part of UTHealth. “The imaging agents allow us to peek at the diseased area and the therapeutic agents allow us to treat it. Thus the nickname Peek and Treat.”

If the drug delivery system proceeds to clinical trials and proves effective, it could provide enhanced imaging in patients using Magnetic Resonance Imaging at a resolution far exceeding current capabilities. It also could be used for the targeted delivery of a variety of therapeutic agents, according to the other lead researcher, Jason Eriksen, Ph.D., an assistant professor of pharmacology at UH. “These nanocarriers allow us to deliver a nearly unlimited variety of compounds to the brain. Since we can perform high-resolution imaging of Amyloid-Beta with this technology, we will be able to determine if a drug treatment effectively hits its target, early on in the disease process.”

Armour added, “Finding a cure and better treatments for Alzheimer’s can only be achieved by gaining a better understanding of the disease. Research is where it must start, and Cure Alzheimer’s Fund remains committed to funding researchers like those at UTHealth and UH who are doing groundbreaking work that could bring us one step closer to our goal to finding a cure.”

The UTHealth research team includes Eric Ambe Tanifum, Ph.D., and Indrani Dasgupta, Ph.D., who are both postdoctoral fellows at the UT School of Health Information Sciences at Houston.

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Cure Alzheimer's FundTM is a public charity established to provide funding for targeted research into the causes of Alzheimer’s disease. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund supports and funds research with the highest probability of slowing, stopping or reversing Alzheimer’s disease by 2016. Since its inception in 2004, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has raised more than $15 million, investing all of it directly into research. For more information please visit http://www.curealzfund.org

New Report is Old News: Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has the Strategy and Roadmap to a Cure

Over the course of the last 5 years, all of us here at Cure Alzheimer’s Fund have been saying the same thing – Alzheimer’s is a national disaster, an encroaching tsunami that has the potential to bankrupt our entire health care system.

And, if you’ve been following the news this week, you’ve likely seen the recent Alzheimer’s Association report portraying this very same message.

Yes, we all agree – Alzheimer’s disease is a national imperative. In fact, a YEAR ago, we released our plan for a national strategy to end Alzheimer’s disease. As no other group has done, we called for a 10 year funding strategy of $5 billion per year and laid out a roadmap for exactly how that money should be spent -- because it’s not simply a fundraising battle. It’s just as important to know how to spend the resources most efficiently to find a cure. See our National Strategic Plan on our website at www.curealzfund.org.

$5 billion per year for research? In these economic times? YES.

As the just-released report says, within the next 10 years, the US government will spend $20 trillion on care for Alzheimer’s through Medicare and Medicaid.  That’s roughly 400 times what we spend on the research that will one day find the cure to this devastating disease. Until we re-balance that equation, we will NEVER change the trajectory of Alzheimer’s disease.

If we spend $5 billion per year for 10 years, that still doesn’t even come close to the ever-increasing cost of paying for the consequences of the disease. $50 billion vs. $20 Trillion. Which would you rather spend?

Of course we have to care for people with the disease; but we also have to dramatically increase the money we spend on research AND target that money strategically for the fastest way to a cure.  More money is one key; but more clear thinking about how to spend the money is the other imperative.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has a plan. So far, by following our roadmap, we have supported research that has identified over 100 genes associated with Alzheimer’s disease, a project the government has been working on for years. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund support has also helped validate the “oligomer” theory of Alzheimer’s pathology that shows that clumps of the Abeta peptide (oligomers) are the toxic entity that damages the synapses within the brain, not the well-known plaques.

And just recently, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund supported research has proposed a whole new paradigm for understanding Alzheimer’s pathology by pointing to the Abeta peptide, once believed to be only “junk” involved in causing Alzheimer’s disease, as actually part of the innate immune system!

Targeted research, well supported by public and private sources, is the only way we will “change the trajectory” of Alzheimer’s disease.

Thank you to those who have joined with us to support this kind of groundbreaking research, and welcome to those who join us now. Now is the time!

$21,500 Raised from Inaugural Running 4 Answers

WOW. If we could only use one word to describe the inaugural Running 4 Answers, "WOW" would have to be it.

An event that sounded like a good idea 10 months ago, turned into a very windy, but perfect morning that welcomed almost 300 runners, walkers, spectators and volunteers and raised almost $21,500 for Cure Alzheimer's Fund. Not bad for a first try!

The list of people we have to thank is long. First on that list are the people of Cure Alzheimer's Fund who provided us with tremendous support:  Katie Cutler, Mariah Baril-Dore, Laurel Lyle and of course, Tim Armour.

Special thanks need to go to our technical/artistic support, Chris Gieger of Gieger Visual Communications (www.gieger.com) and printer, John Moss of Galvanic Printing (www.galvanicprinting.com). These gentlemen donated ALL of their work to Running 4 Answers – graphic design, website, posters, flyers and brochures. The cost of this alone would have been a huge hit to our little race &nash; we are so grateful! Without the support of our families and friends, up to and including race day, we never would have had such success.

Running 4 Answers progressed from a vague concept that at times seemed impossible to an event that was not only a great race, but also raised awareness of Alzheimer’s disease.

We are already developing ideas to make Running 4 Answers 2011 bigger and better than this year. Our plans include becoming our own non-profit organization, investing some money in advertising, working with other races to get the word out, and finding sponsors that make sense for our cause...i.e., hospitals, assisted living facilities.

On a personal note, this race altered a situation that has been hell from the beginning and made it something constructive. Something that gave meaning to the pain that my family and I have felt over the past ten years. It did not change my mom's situation or cure the disease, but it’s a step in the right direction.

We will be posting updates on our website as we have them.

Thank you again for your dedication and enthusiasm, and please continue to support Cure Alzheimer’s Fund and Running 4 Answers!

-Carolyn & Barbara

Cure Alzheimer's Fund Awards Grant to University of Colorado School of Medicine

Boston – Cure Alzheimer’s Fund recently awarded Dr. Nicholas Seeds, with the University of Colorado School of Medicine, a $100,000 grant for novel research on Alzheimer’s disease, which affects 5.2 million Americans and their families and is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly.

“This research has the potential to unlock a new understanding of the causes and risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease,” said Tim Armour, President and CEO of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund. “It could bring us a step closer to ultimately stopping or even reversing its effects.”

The grant will allow Seeds’ lab to continue research on neuroserpin, a protease inhibitor in the brain that is a possible contributor to the onset of Alzheimer’s.  The lab’s research on mice shows that the deletion of the neuroserpin gene can lead to a reduction of Amyloid-Beta, a protein in the brain that is commonly linked to Alzheimer’s disease, and may result in restoration of normal cognitive behavior.  Most importantly, Seeds aims to identify small molecules that block neuroserpin. The goal is to create Alzheimer’s therapeutics for future patient studies.

“With university budgets stretched thin, the Fund’s support is critical in helping further this important research on this devastating disease,” said Seeds, a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics at the Colorado medical school.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has no endowment and passes funds raised directly to selected research. The Fund has no financial or intellectual property interest in the research funded, and will make known the results of all funded research as soon as possible. Over the past ten years the federal government’s investment in Alzheimer’s research and education has decreased. Since it’s inception in 2004, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has raised more than $15 million, investing all of it directly into research.

“Research is key to finding a cure and better treatments for Alzheimer’s disease,” said Armour.  “With the advances in technology over the past 10 years, great strides have been made in Alzheimer’s research and we are on the cusp of major breakthroughs. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund believes the pioneering work of the University of Colorado School of Medicine researchers and others could bring us one step closer to our goal of finding a cure.”

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About Cure Alzheimer's Fund

Cure Alzheimer's Fund™ is a 501c3 public charity whose mission is to fund research with the highest probability of slowing, stopping or reversing Alzheimer's disease. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund is characterized by a venture approach to philanthropy, which targets funding to specific research objectives. All expenses and overhead is paid for by its founders and all contributions go directly to research. The Foundation has no financial or intellectual property interest in the research funded, and will make known the results of all funded research as soon as possible. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund is a national organization with offices in Boston and Pittsburgh. For more information, visit www.curealzfund.org.

About University of Colorado School of Medicine

Faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine work to advance science and improve care. These faculty members include physicians, educators and scientists at University of Colorado Hospital, The Children’s Hospital, Denver Health, National Jewish Health, and the Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Degrees offered by the School of Medicine include doctor of medicine, doctor of physical therapy, and masters of physician assistant studies. The school is located on the Anschutz Medical Campus, one of four campuses in the University of Colorado system.

 

Cure Alzheimer's Fund Chairman and Co-Founder Jeff Morby at Miliken Conference: We Need a National Strategy to Beat Alzheimer's

 

Jeff Morby, Chairman and co-founder of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund, was a featured panelist at the Milken Global Conference in Los Angeles on Wednesday, April 28. The presentation was titled, “Alzheimer’s Disease: Meeting the Challenges of an Aging Society”.  Click here to watch Jeff, Harry Johns, the President and CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association and Greg Simon, the Senior Vice President for Worldwide Policy for Pfizer, address the need for a national strategy to battle the disease.

 

Milken Panel Concludes National Strategy is the Only Way to a Cure

Our very own Jeff Morby, Chairman and co-founder of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund, was a featured panelist at the Milken Global Conference in L.A. this week where he led the charge, calling for a national strategy for a cure.

The presentation titled, “Alzheimer’s Disease: Meeting the Challenges of an Aging Society,” also featured fellow industry heavyweights Harry Johns, President and CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association and Greg Simon, Senior Vice President for Worldwide Policy, Pfizer. Discussion focused on building a climate for a cure, from public awareness to government to private investment. All agreed upon one critical step that must be taken -- the creation of a national strategy for a cure by 2020. Click here to view the video.

Simon kicked off the discussion noting that to discuss the process of finding a cure is depressing; it is expensive and probably years ahead of us. But the point driven home by all three gentlemen is that we will get there a lot faster if we build a national consensus around the importance of doing so now.

On the same “aspirational” theory as putting a man on the moon, stopping polio or any of the other campaigns that were once looked upon as naively ambitious, Morby argued that a national drive to overcome Alzheimer’s is necessary to muster the resources to do the job in time to head off the “silver tsunami” that will overwhelm our healthcare resources. Almost half of people over 85 have the disease, and in 2010 the Medicare and Medicaid expenses alone were $186 billion. That number will only go higher exponentially the longer we are unable to control the onset of the disease.

So hooray for the leaders of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund, the Alzheimer’s Association and a senior representative of a Pharma for the courage to be bold and begin the drum beat for a national strategy to end Alzheimer’s disease!

APOE and Alzheimer’s Disease

Co-chaired by three members of CAF’s Research Consortium—Drs. David Holtzman, Sam Sisodia and Rudy Tanzi—participants included all the other members of the Research Consortium (except Virginia Lee, who had a prior commitment) and several invited guests whose records of research include valuable insights into this relationship. The guests were Michael Brown, MD, and Joachim Herz, MD, Southwestern Medical School; Alan Tall, MD, Columbia University; Karl Weisgraber, Ph.D., Gladstone Institute, University of California, San Francisco; and Cheryl Wellington, Ph.D., University of British Columbia.

Abeta May Have Beneficial Function as Part of the Innate Immune System

The Amyloid-beta protein is a key contributor to Alzheimer’s pathology and the prevailing theory has been that Abeta has no function other than as a waste product created by the brain. It is acknowledged by most researchers to be a key “bad guy” in Alzheimer’s pathology.

Why don’t the drugs work?

A spate of headlines recently dimmed hopes for a wonder drug to fight Alzheimer’s disease. We know the existing drugs used to treat Alzheimer’s patients, including Aricept, Namenda and others, provide only modest symptomatic relief but do not treat the root pathology of the disease. Let’s look at three new drugs that attempted to get at the causes of the disease but failed. We’ll look at the “bad news,” comment on why they failed and then look at what’s in the pipeline signaling better news.